Issue 85/2-2017

22/09/2017 Anna Křivánková


Contents

Articles

 

Yehudit Dror
Grammatical Parallelism in the Qur’ān………………………………………………..165–189

Parallelism – or, as it is called in Arabic, al-muqābala occupies a central position in the rhetorical discipline of ‘ilm al-badī‘. Parallelism is used as a means of textual ornamentation or embellishment and can be divided into several types that are based on the semantics of parallelism and its formative structure. Parallelism in Arabic has received a considerable amount of attention from Arabic rhetoricians, and this has facilitated an understanding of the essence of parallelism in Arabic – its types, structures and meaning. However, there are some lacunae in their descriptions concerning the function and thematic restrictions of parallelism in the Qur’ān. The current article, which focuses on grammatical parallelism where the two stichos of parallelism are the same with respect to syntax and morphology, shows that parallelism has some important roles to play in textual arrangement. It may, for example, conclude a thematic section, indicate a turning point in the text or clarify what has been said previously. In addition, it is shown that parallelism is not used at random in the Qur’ān but rather is restricted to repeated themes which carry the most important messages of the Qur’ān, such as God’s Might or the behavioral patterns of believers and non-believers; or it can be used as a stylistic device.

KEYWORDS
Grammatical parallelism | half-line | symmetry

About the Author

YEHUDIT DROR received her BA in Arabic and Middle East Studies from the Hebrew University, a Master in Arabic from the University of Haifa and a PhD in Arabic from Erlangen-Nürnberg University, Germany (2010). Since 2011, she is a lecturer at the Department of Arabic Language and Literature at the University of Haifa. Her primary interest is Arabic syntax, particularly the syntax of the Qur’ān. Her current articles concern different grammatical and syntactic phenomena in the Qur’ān, such as functions of various particles, word order issues, time and aspect and agreement pattern.
e-mail: judror@gmail.com

Katarína Bešková
The Thousand and One Nights as a Source for Sa‘dallāh Wannūs’s
Play The King is the King……………………………………………………………………191–218

This article aims to explore the intertextual relationship between one of Sa‘dallāh Wannūs’s best known plays, The King is the King, and the collection of popular stories known as the Thousand and One Nights, especially “The Story of the Sleeper and the Waker,” on which the play was based. The dramatic work was written as a part of Wannūs’s theatre of politicization project (masraḥ at-tasyīs), in which he managed to merge the elements of Arabic popular narrative tradition and European modernist theatrical techniques. The paper examines how the concept of Brecht’s epic theatre and his alienation devices affected Wannūs’s work. The article seeks to analyse the play with respect to Wannūs’s socio-political, artistic and aesthetic views and, at the same time, it attempts to trace the scope of the influence of the Thousand and One Nights on the work. The article argues that while the play was most certainly inspired by the popular tale, the political message of the original story has been subverted.

KEYWORDS
Sa‘dallāh Wannūs | the Thousand and One Nights | Arabic literature | popular literature | The King is the King | theatre of politicization | epic theatre

About the Author

KATARÍNA BEŠKOVÁ received her PhD in Arabic Literature from Comenius University in Bratislava and currently works as a research fellow at the Slovak  Academy of Sciences. She specialises in modern and contemporary Arabic literature and, in her thesis, she concentrated on the influence of the Thousand and One Nights on modern Arabic literary works.
e-mail: kkobzosova@gmail.com

Soumya Mohan Ghosh and Rajni Singh
Violated Bodies and the Reclamation of Female Subjectivity in Usha Ganguli’s Ham Mukhtārā and Maya Krishna Rao’s Walk………………………………………219–259

The article sets out to analyze the victimization and objectification of women and the assertion of female subjectivity in the agitprop theatres of Usha Ganguly and Maya Krishna Rao. The article focuses on Ganguly’s Ham Mukhtārā, an adaptation of Mukhtār Māī’s autobiography, In the Name of Honor: A Memoir, which registers protest against a patriarchal society that subjugates women, as well as Rao’s Walk, which challenges the dynamics of power and the societal ostracization of women. The article argues that in the wake of the Nirbhayā case and the ripples created in society by the protests, candlelit marches, and public performances, these recent feminist-propagandist plays are conceived as part of an ongoing pursuit on the part of both artists to resist the phallocentric objectification and reductive categorization of the female body and to reclaim the agency and subjectivity of women.

KEYWORDS
Feminist representation of rape | female body | female subjectivity | patriarchy

About the Authors

SOUMYA MOHAN GHOSH completed his MA (English) with Pondicherry University, Puducherry. Currently, he is a Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad. He has published numerous research papers in many international journals of repute, including journals indexed in the Thomson Reuters database. In addition, he has presented a number of articles at international seminars/conferences. His areas of interest are Feminist Theatre, Gender Studies, Postcolonial Literature, Translation Studies and Indian English Literature.
e-mail: soumya.rkmv@gmail.com

RAJNI SINGH completed her MA (English) with Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, and received her PhD from the same institute. Currently, she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines), Dhanbad. Her articles have been published in many international journals, including journals indexed in the Thomson Reuters database. She has also presented many research papers at prestigious institutions abroad, as well as published books of literary merit. She is an Eliotian and Tennysonian scholar. Her areas of specialization are Feminist Theatre, Gender Studies, Victorian and Modern poetry, Indian English poetry, Literary Theory, and English Language Teaching.
e-mail: rajnisingh18@gmail.com

Baorong Wang
George Kin Leung’s English Translation of Lu Xun’s A Q Zhengzhuan…253–281

Republican China (1912–49) saw the rise and fall of a sub-field of source cultureinitiated foreign language translations of Chinese literature targeted at both expatriate and domestic audiences in China. This unique translation phenomenon, which challenges Gideon Toury’s generally held assumption that “translations are facts of target cultures,” has hitherto been under-researched in and outside of China. This paper presents the findings of a case study of George Kin Leung’s English translation of Lu Xun’s fictional masterpiece A Q Zhengzhuan (The True Story of Ah Q). Four socio-cultural factors which engendered the emergence of this sub-field in the early Republican years are analyzed. Inspired by French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of the field of cultural production, this putative sub-field of restricted production is interpreted as functioning primarily on the basis of the accumulation of symbolic capital. Leung’s participation in the dynamics of this historical field is examined by tracing his professional trajectory, followed by an analysis of his motivation for translating A Q Zhengzhuan – to make a name for himself or to accumulate symbolic capital in the field. It is then found through text analysis that Leung’s version shows a combination of overall literalness and occasional license. A tentative explanation is sought by drawing on André Lefevere’s theory of rewriting. The primary conclusion is that Leung’s literalistic approach to translation was dictated by the intended readership and the translation norm (i.e., literal translation) that prevailed in 1920s’ China, while the liberties Leung took with the original text reveal the influence ofhis ideology, poetics and aesthetics.

KEYWORDS
Source culture-initiated translations | sub-field of restricted production |
accumulation of symbolic capital | George Kin Leung | Lu Xun | A Q Zhengzhuan

About the Author

BAORONG WANG received his PhD in Translation Studies from The University of Hong Kong in 2012. He is currently a Professor of Translation Studies and the Director of the Center for Translation Studies at Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics in Hangzhou, PRC. His research interests include history of translation, sociology of translation, English translation and dissemination of Chinese literature, etc. He has published a monograph (in Chinese) on Lu Xun’s fiction in English translation and more than 50 academic papers in both Chinese and international translation studies journals. He is also an active Chinese translator of English academic works on contemporary Chinese literature.
e-mail: abrwanghz2014@outlook.com

Pierantonio Zanotti
Beyond Naturalism: Sōma Gyofū, Italian Futurism, and the Search for a New “Art of Force”…………………………………………………………………………………….283–303

Sōma Gyofū (1883–1950), one of the most influential literary critics in Taishō Japan (1912–26), published a short essay called “Gendai geijutsu no chūshin seimei” (The central life in contemporary art) in the March 1913 issue of Waseda bungaku (Waseda literature). In it, after illustrating the shortcomings of a number of outlooks on modern life provided by European writers and philosophers, he praised Italian Futurism as the sole movement that came closest to his own ideal of an “art of force” able to cope with the anguished condition of man in a modern technological society. By combining historical research and a textual overview on publications that shaped Gyofū’s knowledge of Futurism, I show how Gyofū’s reception of Futurism was mediated by his philosophical background, which was characterized by an attempt at going beyond Japanese naturalism (shizenshugi). In that, “Gendai geijutsu no chūshin seimei” can be seen as representative of a transition in the Japanese literary scene, which, in the shift from the Meiji to the Taishō era, was experiencing a crisis of naturalism and the rise of discourses centred on “life,” the “self,” and their creative potential.

KEYWORDS
Sōma Gyofū | futurism in Japan | Japanese literature of the 1910s | Taishō literature |
shizenshugi | miraiha | history of Japanese literary criticism | Waseda bungaku | vitalism | seimeishugi

About the Author

PIERANTONIO ZANOTTI, PhD (Venice, 2009), is research fellow of Japanese literature at Ca’ Foscari University of Venice. He is a contributing editor of the International Yearbook of Futurism Studies. His research interests focus on Japanese literature of the early twentieth century and the reception accorded to European avant-garde movements (especially Italian Futurism) in Japan. His publications comprise “The Semantics of the Avant-garde in Yamamura Bochō’s Prismism” (in Rethinking Japanese Modernism, ed. by Roy Starrs, 2011), and “What is Miraiha? Academic Discourses on Japanese Futurism” (in the 2012 International Yearbook of Futurism Studies).
e-mail: pierantonio.zanotti@unive.it

Review Articles

 

Nathan W. Hill
The State of Sino-Tibetan……………………………………………………………………305–315

About the Author

NATHAN W. HILL is Reader in Tibetan and Historical Linguistics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has published various works on Tibetan historical phonology, Tibetan philology, Trans-Himalayan comparative linguistics, and the typology of evidential systems.
e-mail: nh36@soas.ac.uk

Liping Bai
Re-envisioning Manchu and Qing History: A Question of Sinicization….317–328

About the Author

LIPING BAI is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Translation of Lingnan University, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong. His research interests include translation studies, literary translation and history of translation. He is the author of the book entitled Fanyijia Liang Shiqiu (Liang Shiqiu as a Translator) published by Beijing Commercial Press (2016). His academic articles appear in international journals including Across Languages and Cultures, Archiv orientální / Oriental Archive, Babel, Neohelicon, Perspectives, Humanitas, Tsing Hua Journal of Chinese Studies, The Translator, and Translation Quarterly. He is also interested in practical translation and has published a number of translations between Chinese and English.
e-mail: lipingbai@ln.edu.hk

Book Reviews and Notes

 

Chiori Kitagawa. The Tomb of the Dogs at Asyut. Faunal Remains
and Other Selected Objects.
(Břetislav Vachala) ………………………………………………………………………………329–332

Sandrine Vuilleumier. Un rituel osirien en faveur de particuliers à l’époque
ptolémaïque. Papyrus Princeton Pharaonic Roll 10.
(Stefan Bojowald) ………………………………………………………………………………..333–335

Holger Kockelmann, Erich Winter. Philae III, Die Zweite Ostkolonnade des Tempels der Isis in Philae (CO II und CO II K).
(Stefan Bojowald) ………………………………………………………………………………..336–337

Šárka Velhartická, ed. Audias fabulas veteres. Anatolian Studies
in Honor of Jana Součková-Siegelová.
(Pavel Čech) ……………………………………………………………………………………….338–339

 

Our Contributors…………………………………………………………………………………. 341–443